Monday, April 16, 2007

Why Camp Three Arrows?

So, there are our young idealists, wandering around southern Ontario, looking for a cheap piece of land. We'll leave them to wander for a little longer. Let's take a quick side-trip to look at Camp Three Arrows' name and symbol:





The arrows point to the LEFT -- by design, not by accident. They stand for three socialist principles: bread, peace, and freedom. This was a slogan adopted by the International Free Trade Unionists in the 1940s, but I found references to it earlier than that. (But don't politicos of all stripes yearn for these things?) As far as I know, the symbol was always green.

There is one theory that the design originated during Nazi-era Germany. If one saw a swastika, one negated it by drawing three diagonal lines or arrows through it. I'll have to investigate this one day.

Next up: Camp buys some land.

7 comments:

Will said...

(Not sure why these are particularly socialist ideals; don't politicos of all stripes yearn for these things?

In short - no. Neither subjectively nor objectively do the 'right' or 'centrists' or 'leftists' have these as 'ideals'.

The point
http://www.marxists.org/archive/james-clr/works/world/ch03.htmThe international revolution would begin with the inevitable second revolution in Russia. The people had not made a revolution to get rid of Tsarism. They wanted *land, bread, peace and freedom*. But the Miliukov Government was a bourgeois Government. It could not give the peasants the land because that would ruin the banks on whose stability bourgeois life depended; it could not give peace because it was bound by financial ties to the war-making bourgeoisie of Western Europe; it could not give bread because bread could only be got by revolutionary measures against the landlords and capitalists, and these measures a Government of landlords and capitalists would not take; it could not give freedom because it was a Government of the propertied classes and was afraid of the people.

The means to get bread etc...: the Bolshevik program, summarized in the slogan “Bread, peace, and freedom”

The method:
http://www.marxists.org/archive/marx/works/1848/communist-manifesto/

The fact is that all these historical figures (your relations included) had not the slightest thought of denying, transcendentally or even in an empiricist way, the reality of the 'public' world. They were rather, very much concerned with affirming this world and the fact that there is only this world, a natural world of matter, not of spirits or dualism. In this way they weren't idealists.

In another sense they were idealists. They were idealists in the method they chose to achieve their aims.

Jo said...

I knew I was getting in over my head when I started this.

Robert G. said...

He's not as clever as he thinks he is. And he can't do cryptic crosswords or sudoku to save his life.

Will said...

"...he can't do cryptic crosswords or sudoku to save his life."

True. Very true. I think you have to be a certain thought of heed-the-ball to even want to do any of that sort of thing.

Robert G. said...

You and your colourful regional cricket allusions...

Transmontanus said...

"They were rather, very much concerned with affirming this world and the fact that there is only this world."

Except for the Protestants what started the NDP so.

(I'm going to regret mentioning that, you just watch.)

Robert G. said...

Well, I was going to say...